Sea of Reads

Peripatetic, itinerant, eclectic musings about books, politics, history, language, culture, and anything else that interests me.

2013 Books Read

 

  1. The Lost Upland: Stories of Southwestern France, by W.S. Merwin.
  2.  On Kissing, Tickling, and Being Bored: Psychoanalytic Essays on the Unexamined Life, by Adam Phillips.
  3. Invisible Man, by Ralph Ellison.
  4. The Pillars of Hercules: A Grand Tour of the Mediterranean, by Paul Theroux
  5. A Backward Glance, by Edith Wharton
  6. Madame Bovary, by Gustave Flaubert
  7. The Sense of an Ending, by Julian Barnes
  8. “The Negro President”: Jefferson and the Slave Power, by Garry Wills
  9. Civilization and Its Discontents, by Sigmund Freud
  10. A History of Reading, by Alberto Manguel
  11. Paris France, by Gertrude Stein
  12. The Third Angel, by Alice Hoffman
  13. Walden, by Henry David Thoreau
  14. Conduct Unbecoming: Gays & Lesbians in the U.S. Military, by Randy Shilts
  15. East of Eden, by John Steinbeck
  16. Charles Dickens, by Michael Slater
  17. Mort, by Terry Pratchett
  18. Room, by Emma Donoghue
  19. The Brothers Karamazov, by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  20. PrairyErtih, by William Least Heat-Moon
  21. Goodbye To All That, by Robert Graves
  22. Sketches By Boz, by Charles Dickens
  23. Goodbye To a River, by John Graves
  24. The Siege of Krishnapur, by J.G. Farrell
  25. Unorthodox: The Scandalous Rejection of My Hasidic Roots, by Deborah Feldman
  26. Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, by John Berendt
  27. Daniel Deronda, by George Eliot
  28. The Shoemaker’s Wife, by Adriana Trigiani
  29. The Red Garden, by Alice Hoffman
  30. The Last 100 Days, by John Toland
  31. The Custom of the Country, by Edith Wharton
  32. The Pickwick Papers, by Charles Dickens
  33. Caleb’s Crossing, by Geraldine Brooks
  34. Portrait of a Novel: Henry James and the Making of an American Masterpiece, by Michael Gorra
  35. Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte
  36. Goliath: Life and Loathing in Greater Israel, by Max Blumenthal
  37. Roderick Hudson, by Henry James

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